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PURCHASE EXPRESS

PEP & PrEP to Stop HIV
Available On-Demand in Bangkok & Other Provinces

Buy PEP/PrEP at MedEx Neo Clinic in Bangkok and network providers outside Bangkok — All Online. Our specialists provide expert guidance on the safest options to minimize HIV transmission risks.

Visit Clinic or Get Tested at Home. Consult with Doctor In-Person or Online. Pickup Medications or Get them Delivered.

» Same-Day Express Delivery
» Get Required Lab Tests at 50+ Centers or at Home/Hotel
» Visit Centers for Medication Pickup or Get them Delivered
» Specialists available Round the Clock with Teleconsult Option

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4.9/5 Rated (300+ Ratings)

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Buy PEP/PrEP in 3 Simple Steps

01

Schedule Mandatory Lab Tests

At Clinic or Home/Hotel

Schedule required lab tests by submitting the booking form below.

02

Consult with a Doctor for Prescription

In-Person or Online

Talk to a doctor immediately after the results arrive for a prescription.

03

Self-Pickup or Order Express Delivery

Pick-up or Order to Home/Hotel

Once you have a prescription, either pickup at the clinic or get us to deliver.

Featured Packages

PEP is an emergency medication taken after potential exposure to HIV, while PrEP is a preventive medication taken regularly to reduce the risk of HIV transmission. 

PEP (1 Month)

Take within 72 Hours Post-Exposure for 28 Days

PEP (1 Month) + PrEP (1-2 Months)

Take PEP within 72 Hours Post-Exposure for 28 Days

Switch to PrEP after 28 Days if Next Risky Exposure is possible within 1-3 weeks

PrEP (1-3 Months)

Take PrEP Daily if you predict Next Exposure within 1-3 Weeks

Always consult with a healthcare provider for personalized advice tailored to your situation.

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Take Control of YourSexual Health

Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) are revolutionary methods that significantly reduce the risk of contracting HIV. 

PrEP involves taking a daily pill to prevent HIV infection before potential exposure, while PEP involves taking medication after potential exposure to prevent the virus from establishing itself in the body.

Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP)

PEP is a short-term medication regimen taken by individuals who have been potentially exposed to HIV within the past 72 hours. It involves taking a combination of antiretroviral drugs for 28 days to reduce the risk of HIV infection after exposure. PEP is typically recommended in emergency situations such as condom breakage during sex or needle-sharing among injection drug users. It's crucial to start PEP as soon as possible after exposure for maximum effectiveness.

Who Should Consider Taking PEP?

PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis) should be considered by individuals who have been recently exposed to HIV within the past 72 hours. This includes individuals who:

 

  1. Have had unprotected sex with a partner known to be HIV-positive or of unknown HIV status.
  2. Have had condom breakage during sexual intercourse.
  3. Have shared injection drug equipment with a person living with HIV.
  4. Experience occupational exposure to HIV, such as needlestick injuries among healthcare workers.

Side Effects and Interactions

Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) drugs are used to prevent HIV transmission after a possible exposure. However, these drugs may have some side effects, which include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, diarrhea, headaches, dizziness, skin rash, abdominal discomfort, and changes in liver enzyme levels. Although these side effects are usually mild and temporary, individuals undergoing PEP should promptly report any adverse reactions to their healthcare provider for monitoring and possible adjustments to the treatment regimen.

Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)

Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) is a medication regimen used by HIV-negative individuals to reduce their risk of acquiring HIV. It involves taking a daily pill that contains two antiretroviral drugs, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine, which work together to prevent HIV from spreading in the body. When taken consistently, PrEP can significantly lower the chances of contracting HIV through sexual activity or injection drug use. It's a highly effective tool in HIV prevention for individuals at high risk of exposure.

Who Should Consider Taking PEP?

PrEP should be considered by individuals who are HIV-negative but at high risk of contracting HIV. PrEP is recommended for those who:

  1. Have multiple or HIV-positive partners and engage in condomless sex.
  2. Share injection drug equipment.
  3. Are sexually active gay or bisexual men.
  4. Engage in transactional sex or sex work.
  5. Have had a recent sexually transmitted infection (STI).
  6. Have a partner whose HIV status is unknown or who engages in high-risk behaviors.

Side Effects and Interactions

PrEP drugs may have some side effects such as nausea, diarrhea, headaches, fatigue, abdominal discomfort, dizziness, decreased appetite, and rare changes in bone density or kidney function if they are used for a long time. It is vital for individuals taking PrEP to report any concerns or adverse effects to their healthcare provider to ensure proper management and continued adherence to the medication regimen.

PEP is recommended for individuals who have had a recent high-risk exposure to HIV, such as unprotected sex or sharing needles with someone who may be HIV-positive. It should be initiated within 72 hours of exposure.

The key difference between PrEP and PEP lies in their timing and duration of use. PrEP is taken on an ongoing basis by HIV-negative individuals who are at ongoing risk of HIV exposure, whereas PEP is taken after a specific, recent potential exposure to HIV. PrEP is a proactive approach to prevention, while PEP is reactive, used in response to a recent event of possible HIV exposure.

PEP and PrEP are specifically designed to prevent HIV transmission and are not effective against other STIs. However, individuals using PrEP are often encouraged to also practice safer sex behaviors, such as using condoms, to reduce the risk of contracting other infections.

PrEP is typically taken once daily, as prescribed by a healthcare provider. Consistent daily use is essential to ensure maximum effectiveness in reducing the risk of HIV transmission.

CONTACT MEDEX TEAM

EMAIL SUPPORT

mail@medex.co.th

Doctors On Demand

Express In-Person and Online Doctor Consultations

Immediate medical care will be provided if your test results are positive. Enjoy stress-free doctor consultations at MedEx Neo Clinic with prices starting from just 500 THB. You can also access a pool of over 3,000 top specialists at JCI (US)-accredited Thai hospitals in the MedEx Network via our tele-consultation services. Additionally, we offer doorstep delivery of essential healthcare supplies.

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FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

The primary difference between PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis) and PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) lies in their timing and usage. PEP is taken after potential exposure to HIV, typically within 72 hours to prevent HIV infection from taking hold in the body.

On the other hand, PrEP is taken before potential exposure to HIV as a preventive measure.

Both PEP and PrEP use antiretroviral drugs to prevent HIV infection, but they function differently:

  • PEP aims to stop HIV from replicating and spreading in the body shortly after exposure, reducing the likelihood of infection. It's essentially a form of emergency treatment to prevent the virus from taking hold and establishing infection.
  • PrEP, on the other hand, works by delivering a continuous level of antiretroviral medication into the bloodstream, which blocks the virus from establishing itself and replicating if exposure occurs.

PEP drugs have been shown to significantly reduce the risk of HIV infection when initiated promptly after exposure. Studies have demonstrated that PEP treatment, when started within 72 hours of exposure, can reduce the risk of HIV transmission by up to 80%.

PrEP drugs have also been shown to be highly effective in preventing HIV infection when taken consistently as prescribed. Clinical trials have found that daily PrEP use can reduce the risk of HIV acquisition by more than 90% among individuals at high risk of infection

PrEP drugs are recommended for individuals who engage in high-risk behaviors for HIV transmission, such as having multiple sexual partners or injecting drugs. Additionally, PrEP may be prescribed to individuals in serodiscordant relationships, where one partner is HIV-positive and the other is not, to reduce the risk of transmission.

PREP drugs are recommended for individuals who engage in high-risk behaviors for HIV transmission, such as having multiple sexual partners or injecting drugs. Additionally, PREP may be prescribed to individuals in serodiscordant relationships, where one partner is HIV-positive and the other is not, to reduce the risk of transmission.

PEP and PrEP drugs, like many medications, can induce side effects, which vary in severity among individuals. Common side effects of PEP drugs include nausea, diarrhea, fatigue, headache, and, in some cases, liver toxicity or allergic reactions. Similarly, PrEP drugs may cause side effects such as nausea, abdominal discomfort, and headache, with potential long-term implications on kidney function or bone density.